HyundaiNews

Hardcore Hyundai Veloster N Review Drive

When Hyundai presented the Veloster back in 2011 it was something of an enigma and very much quirky. I mean the car came out with confusing door configuration, 2-doors on the left hand side and 1-door on the right hand side, how quirky is that? Ok cool, we can move past that and talk about the styling, which was rather ‘turdish’ to some and ‘jackpot’ to others and our money is firmly on the former. That was 2011 to 2017.

Now there is a new model and is a vast improvement on its predecessor, sadly it still soldiering on with the asymmetric doors setup but now with a prettier than before face. Our focus is on the flagship Veloster N, a car that takes the fight straight to the Scirocco R and may have a case, maybe. This Korean quirk is powered by the same engine as the i30N, a 2.0 turbocharged 4 cylinder unit producing 205kW and 355N.m. Thanks to this sophisticated engine setup and a 6-Speed manual gearbox, this Veloster can reach 100kph from standstill in 5.9 seconds.

The interior is a mix of modern and simple in terms of layout and is dominated by a stacked media screen, and thick leather steering wheel with Hyundai’s baby blue buttons and a manual stick shift lever. There is really not much else to write about here.

This new model Veloster N looks sporty and that is mainly due to the styling elements such as red accents on the bumper, side skirting and the rear diffuser. There is also a third brake light that seems to be inspired by the Formula One design, sitting on the roof spoiler and we think that a cool touch. The front of the car somehow reminds us of a Ford Focus and the rear design is not to our taste by any means.

So how does it drive?
Poised for a sporty drive the Veloster is nothing but soft. We tracked some feedback from a test drive conducted by the fellas at Piston Heads and they seem to think that as well. “Unpretentious is a good word for the Veloster N. Raw, but in a good way.” claims Mike Duff of Piston Heads.

So the Veloster N does not pretend to be cruiser that cushions road bumps with aplomb but rather the opposite.

“Driven less hard, the Hyundai feels more compromised. Chassis control is iron-fisted at speed, although in N mode the dampers feel too hard for anything other than the smoothest roads. But even fully softened the Veloster feels very firm, especially when asked to deal with low-speed bumps.”

In the end the car is then applauded for what it is rather than what it’s not and the conclusion is that “It’s probably the closest thing in production to the recently retired Volkswagen Scirocco. It’s also proof that Hyundai can still do something genuinely different to anything else; not something you could say about any part of the brand’s European portfolio.”

Whether it’s coming to South Africa is another story, I mean we haven’t even received the i30N, let alone the i30.

Full Review at Piston Heads

Related Articles

Free WordPress Themes, Free Android Games